How to Get More Testosterone Than You Need in Your Diet

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has released new guidelines for a low-dose testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) regimen that can potentially increase men’s testosterone levels to around 20 ng/dL.

The guidelines are the latest in a long line of scientific reports and clinical trials examining the safety of testosterone therapy in men.

The goal of the new guidelines is to increase the “testicular volume” that men can have by up to 100%, but that’s still lower than what many men can achieve. 

The new guidelines recommend that men who have had “significant” prostate cancer in their lifetime and who are currently on TRT should consider starting at 20 mg of testosterone per day instead of the current 25 mg. 

It’s important to note that this is still far lower than the “natural” range for testosterone, which ranges from around 30 to 50 ng/mL.

The authors of the study did not find any increase in testosterone levels in men with prostate cancer who switched to a low dose of testosterone in a trial conducted at the University of Washington. 

However, the researchers did find an increase in blood levels of testosterone, and they found a small reduction in the level of circulating estrogen.

The study authors also noted that there were no differences in the number of men they studied who experienced side effects from the low dose testosterone therapy, including acne, weight gain, increased anxiety, and reduced sexual desire.

They also noted there was no difference in the rate of changes in prostate cancer risk between men on TRTs and men on placebo.

The results are a first step in developing the next generation of testosterone therapies, which may be the most promising approach to boosting testosterone levels, according to the authors. 

“Although testosterone has been shown to increase bone density, there is little information about the mechanism(s) by which testosterone can increase bone mass in the body,” the study authors wrote. 

If testosterone therapy can provide more than a boost in bone mass, there’s also the potential for it to have other benefits that could include improved bone health, reduced pain and fatigue, and improved cognition.

According to the NIH, TRT has been used as a way to improve sexual function, improve quality of life, and decrease the risk of prostate cancer.

The most common side effects of TRT therapy include headaches, fatigue, fatigue syndrome, weight loss, and insomnia.

It’s also believed to have some beneficial effects on cardiovascular health and the immune system.

However, a recent review found that testosterone therapy does not provide an optimal range of benefits and could result in serious side effects.

The American Cancer Society also warned against taking testosterone if you’re pregnant, have heart disease, or have had prostate cancer before.

A small study from the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism found that in men, testosterone treatment caused no long-term changes in bone mineral density, but it could cause some men to lose bone mass. 

Researchers at the Institute of Psychiatry at King’s College London recently concluded that testosterone could cause bone loss in some men, and that the research was based on small clinical studies. 

So far, there are no studies looking at the long-run effects of testosterone treatment on bone density.