‘The first step to restoring balance’: Trump’s new EPA chief

President Donald Trump on Wednesday signed into law a bill that allows the Environmental Protection Agency to temporarily lift restrictions on the production of fossil fuels, a move that he said will boost U.S. energy production.

The law also authorizes the EPA to increase its efforts to regulate greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants, which emit a disproportionate amount of carbon dioxide.

It also allows the EPA, which has been in charge of enforcing the Clean Power Plan, to grant permits for additional coal-burning power plants to begin operations.

The EPA’s new director, Scott Pruitt, said he would be moving quickly to implement the plan, which was set to go into effect in 2030.

Pruitt’s predecessor, former President Barack Obama, issued the order that halted the implementation of the law in December.

The order, signed by Pruitt, required that the U.N. ban on fossil fuels be lifted, but that the EPA had the authority to extend it to other sectors, such as building materials, vehicles and air-conditioning.

Trump said he was taking “a step toward restoring balance” in the U-P-E program.

“I’m giving the EPA the authority it needs to take a look at what we’re doing and whether it’s working, and what our alternatives are, and then hopefully, we’ll see how we can continue to move forward,” he said.

The legislation has been opposed by a wide array of environmental groups and other groups, including groups fighting for climate change.

But the White House on Wednesday cited the administration’s success in getting the U,S.

from the brink of a climate disaster during a speech in which he vowed to bring “peace and prosperity” to the nation and to the world.

The White House did not say how long the plan would take to be implemented, but Trump said that in “a few years we’ll be at peace and prosperity again.”

He said he had spoken to the heads of the major coal mining companies and the head of the oil industry, and said that the coal industry was “getting more and more worried” about the climate.

“The way the American people are responding to this is so incredible,” Trump said.

“This is what we need to do.”

The White Houses energy secretary, Rick Perry, said Wednesday that the Trump administration had been “on the right side of history” in its push to lift the ban.

“We’re not trying to kill coal,” Perry said during a conference call with reporters.

“It’s just that we’re not using a lot of it.”

The move by the Trump White House came as the Obama administration, which imposed the Clean Water Rule in the 1980s, was struggling to comply with court orders to remove the rule.

The court ordered the EPA in March to halt the implementation and enforcement of the rule until a new administration took office.

Perry said the new administration would work to make the rule more efficient.

The Clean Water Act, which had been in place since 1973, required the EPA and the states to take actions to reduce harmful sediment and pollutants from streams and wetlands and the discharge of wastewater from power plants.

Trump has vowed to undo the rule, saying it is “unworkable.”

He also has said that he wants to eliminate the rule from the U.-P-Es energy portfolio, which includes power plants and gas-fired plants.

The new law gives the EPA authority to issue permits for coal- and gas pipeline projects, which will help the agency make more efficient use of the fossil fuel resources that are in the national parks and other areas that are closed to the development of new power plants because of climate change, according to the EPA.

“As we continue to develop a clean energy portfolio that is able to meet the future needs of the American public, we will continue to review the rules and regulations for compliance,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy.

Pruitt said during his confirmation hearing that the Clean Air Act and the Clean Drinking Water Act are “fundamentally flawed” and should be changed.

“When the EPA is given authority to regulate pollutants, and when we have to do it with the highest degree of effectiveness and safety, we’re going to do that,” he told Sen. Jeff Merkley, D-Ore.

“And if we don’t take the lead, we are going into a world that’s going to be very unbalanced, that will be very volatile, that is going to continue to be unstable.” “

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said he will work with Congress to address climate change during a confirmation hearing. “

And if we don’t take the lead, we are going into a world that’s going to be very unbalanced, that will be very volatile, that is going to continue to be unstable.”

EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt said he will work with Congress to address climate change during a confirmation hearing.

He said during the confirmation hearing he would “seek to make sure that this is done with the